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The National Trust is to increase its membership charges to help fund its wide-ranging heritage and nature conservation projects.
From next month, people over 26 will pay £3 a year extra, while family membership will go up by £6 a year. A family with two adult members will now pay £126 a year.
Over-60s who have been members for at least five of the past 10 years will see a £2.52 annual rise and a joint loyal senior membership will go up by £4.80, while young people aged 18-25 will pay an extra £1.50 a year.
There is no rise in the £10 membership for junior members aged five to 17 which was introduced last year.
The trust said the increase would generate an extra £11million to pay for work to protect countryside and heritage, and major spending projects in the North East include two on the Northumberland coast.
In 2017 the trust acquired its first stretch of Northumberland coastal land for almost 30 years in a £1.5m deal.

It might not mean much to families outside the region but the word 'plodge' is a familiar one in the North East and it has fond associations: mainly to do with getting messy.
And that's exactly what our local National Trust properties - from Northumberland to Sunderland - are inviting families to do over the upcoming February half-term.
It has drawn up a programme of events for the school holidays which encourage all ages to get out and about - and messy, muddy and back in touch with nature at the same time.  So that means digging out those wellies.
Besides the likes of enjoying a plodge in the mud at Gibside and making the sloppiest of mud pies at Seaton Delaval Hall, ideas include helping to plant 100,000 snowdrops at Wallington and building a bird box at Souter Lighthouse.
The National Trust also has a list of '50 things to do before you're 11 ¾’ challenges, which range from  jumping in puddles to making homes for wildlife.
Here are its top seven suggestions for where to visit - and the venues' normal admission charges will apply.

More cuts, a council tax rise of just under 4% and well over half-a-billion pounds of capital spending are on the cards in Northumberland in the coming years.
The county council has now published its detailed budget for 2019-20 as well as its medium-term financial plan for the next three years, with proposals for cutting £25m out of the required savings of £36m - including £12.8m next year.
Ratepayers will be doing their bit with council tax to increase by 2.99% - the maximum allowed by the Government without a local authority holding a referendum, plus a further 1% ring-fenced for adult social care.
But this doesn't mean that there won't be investment in the county, with a significant £589m of spending lined up.
Council leader Peter Jackson said: "We've worked tirelessly over the past year to balance our books and we're confident we'll be delivering a deliverable but ambitious budget.
"We've always had bold plans and this budget will help support a thriving local economy and deliver value for money for all the communities we serve."

A former aftershave factory in Northumberland could become a vegan food facility owned by Heather Mills, the former wife of Paul McCartney.
Government Minister Jake Berry is to speak with VBites, the vegan food company founded by Ms Mills, to see if the Government can help it buy the former Coty factory, which is in Seaton Delaval.
The possible move was raised in the House of Commons by MP Ronnie Campbell. He said the scheme could provide up to 1,000 jobs, but VBites faced costs of £6 million to get the factory up and running, on top of the cost of buying it.
Heather took to instagram to share her excitement at the developments saying it was 'great news' and she was 'hoping to keep it a surprise'.
He said: "I drive past the factory often, and it is a shame to see that nice factory, which has had a lot of investment put into it, standing empty. I would like to see the Government giving a bit of encouragement and help."
The factory was originally owned by a firm called by Shulton and made Old Spice aftershave. It was then taken over by Procter & Gamble in 1990 before it merged with Coty in a multi billion pound deal.

When Liam Murray says that he received a message from his “friend” asking for a favour, he was more than willing to help.
But Liam says all was not what it seemed and he claims that he was left more than £4,500 out of pocket after being caught by a scam involving Facebook Messenger and PayPal.
Now, he is warning others not to fall into the trap and is telling people how the apparent scam works.
Liam, who is a disability vlogger, said: “This is a warning to anyone with Facebook Messenger. I was sent a message from someone who I thought was my mate, we chatted about normal stuff and then he asked if I had PayPal because he was thinking of getting it. He then came back and said he had it but couldn’t receive any money and he had sold some items on eBay.
“He asked would it be OK if the lady who bought them paid money into my account? I said as long as I didn’t need to give out any bank details and only my email address that shouldn’t be a problem.
“After doing that I started getting payments to my PayPal which I told my friend about and he asked me to send it to him. Which I did as it was not my money. I took it out of PayPal and put it in my bank and transferred the full amount.”

When Liam Murray says that he received a message from his “friend” asking for a favour, he was more than willing to help.
But Liam says all was not what it seemed and he claims that he was left more than £4,500 out of pocket after being caught by a scam involving Facebook Messenger and PayPal.
Now, he is warning others not to fall into the trap and is telling people how the apparent scam works.
Liam, who is a disability vlogger, said: “This is a warning to anyone with Facebook Messenger. I was sent a message from someone who I thought was my mate, we chatted about normal stuff and then he asked if I had PayPal because he was thinking of getting it. He then came back and said he had it but couldn’t receive any money and he had sold some items on eBay.
“He asked would it be OK if the lady who bought them paid money into my account? I said as long as I didn’t need to give out any bank details and only my email address that shouldn’t be a problem.
“After doing that I started getting payments to my PayPal which I told my friend about and he asked me to send it to him. Which I did as it was not my money. I took it out of PayPal and put it in my bank and transferred the full amount.”



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