Jump to content

News


Bot

You don’t need us to tell you that Northumberland is one of England’s great counties.
Peerless coastlines, rugged scenery, ancient castles, atmospheric battlefields, noble stately homes, and charming towns and villages, it’s got the lot – not to mention the small matter of Hadrian’s Wall, a spectacular and ancient reminder of the Romans’ time in Britain.
With its rivers, forests and hills, it is also, in places, a bleakly beautiful corner of the UK.
Now, local historian and photographer Steve Ellwood, in his latest book 50 Gems Of Northumberland, highlights the very best of the county.
Steve, who hails from Westerhope in Newcastle, knows a thing or two about North East history.
His earlier books include River Tyne, and Newcastle in 50 Buildings.

Fading wallpaper, exposed timbers and peeling paint and plasterwork are captured in images taken inside the East Wing of the 18th Century Seaton Delaval Hall in Northumberland .
They might show that the wing - normally closed to the public - is in need of care and attention but the scenes also capture the enduring beauty and grandeur of the building.
The Chronicle was granted a peek inside the wing of the National Trust property which has none of the gilt and glitter of its mirror image West Wing directly opposite, where visitors can admire paintings and furnishings and hear stories of the infamous parties given by the flamboyant Gay Delavals who once lived there.
By comparison, the atmospheric East Wing - whose rabbit warren corridors and succession of spacious rooms reflect changing decorations and styles over the years - is not open to visitors.
But, besides giving a sense of its scale and history, a look inside reveals plenty evidence of its ongoing role as more of a working wing.
Boasting a variety of current uses, it is classed as the estate wing and includes offices, stores and accommodation which provided the former living quarters of the estate manager.

It's been playing out over 56 days this summer and now Great Northumberland - the first event of its kind - will be wrapping up this weekend with another first.
Saturday, September 1 offers the first ever opportunity to hear The Great Song of the North which promises to be a coming together of proud traditions and current talents.
The song has been composed as a musical ode to Northumberland and it will be showcased at a concert in Berwick which will round off Great Northumberland in style.
Here's what it's all about.
It's described as a musical love-letter to the county and is a special commission by Northumberland County Council which has been composed by Dominique Le Gendre who, for the past 28 years, has written music for theatre, film, dance, radio and TV.
The London-based Trinidad composer says she took inspiration from the landscape, people and various local communities and towns and created this piece to be performed by community choirs and orchestras.

Eating out with your children can be stressful, especially if your little ones want to run around and play. There’s nothing worse than trying to keep the kids entertained sitting at a table when they still have energy to burn.
But being a parent doesn’t mean you have to miss out on eating out, you just need to find a venue that the kids will enjoy too. Pubs with indoor or outdoor play areas can be a godsend when it comes to giving you the rare chance to relax while your little ones keep themselves happily busy.
So with better weather upon us, we thought you might find it useful to have a list of 10 family friendly places to eat and drink with children in and around Newcastle .
Hartley Lane, Earsdon, Whitley Bay, NE25 0SZ, 0191 2529352
The Beehive is a great country pub offering fantastic food. It is close to the coast and in view of St Mary’s Island and the golden Longsands of Whitley Bay, so is a great place to stop off for a bite to eat after a trip to the coast.
It’s also very family friendly as it has a one acre ‘secret’ beer garden which has a state-of-the-art kids play area, offering hours of fun for youngsters. The pub is also dog friendly so why not take your pooch along for a full family day out?

The Delaval family were a pretty batty lot with their love of theatricals and practical jokes on guests at their Northumberland stately home.
Now Seaton Delaval Hall is living up to the old tradition after the discovery that the 18th century building is home to the largest common pipistrelle winter bat roost in the UK.
A total of 61 pipistrelle bats have been recorded in stone crevices and in the arches of a balcony at the hall.
And the discovery turns on its head ecologists’ long held belief that the pipistrelle prefers to hibernate in very dark, damp conditions, with these bats found hanging out in a dry, arid, relatively well-lit area of the National Trust building.
It comes after the trust commissioned an ecological survey ahead of work starting in November on repair and conservation work at the hall after a £3.7m award from the National Lottery.
Bat ecologist Tina Wiffen said: “We discovered the bats when we were undertaking an ecological survey to assess the possibility of introducing new art and visitor information installations into the Central Hall of the building.



×