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  1. March wedding fair for Morpeth

    A wedding fair is to be held in Morpeth next month, providing the perfect opportunity for couples planning their big day to meet local wedding suppliers and find everything they need, all under one roof. The wedding fair will take place in the historic Morpeth Town Hall on Sunday 18th March 2018, between 11am - 3pm. The event is being organised by Northumberland County Council’s Registration Service to promote the town’s stunning, affordable wedding venue and to support local wedding suppliers. It is free to enter and refreshments will be available. Over 25 North East based wedding specialists have signed up to attend the fair and promote their products and services. Among the line-up are wedding outfitters, florists, car hire specialists, photographers, music and entertainment companies and catering and cake makers. Throughout the day, the Northumberland Registrars will be available to offer couples advice and guidance on booking their Registrars and planning and personalising their ceremony. Morpeth Town Hall caters to a range of needs, and offers couples the chance to have a small intimate ceremony in the Ante room, while larger parties can hire the Ballroom which accommodates up to 80 guests. The iconic town hall was originally designed in 1714 by Sir John Vanbrugh and underwent a beautiful internal refurbished a few years ago. The great architect and dramatist is perhaps better known for his work at such landmark buildings as Blenheim Palace, Castle Howard and Seaton Delaval Hall. Northumberland County Councillor Nick Oliver, cabinet member for corporate services said: “Planning a wedding or civil ceremony can be a bit daunting. The Morpeth fair aims to ease the process by providing the opportunity for couples to come along to meet and talk to many local businesses involved in the wedding industry, in one venue while also having the opportunity to have a look around the impressive rooms in the Town Hall.” The county is currently experiencing a wedding boom with a record number of couples booking to tie the knot in the county. Last year the Northumberland registrars officiated over 1750 marriages and so far this year a further 2020 marriages have been booked. What’s more, statistics show that around 65 percent of couples who are getting married in Northumberland are actually coming from outside of the county. Cllr Oliver added “The wedding industry is big business bringing up to £30m into the county each year. It is an industry we want to nurture and develop to help support the many local businesses and jobs that benefit from it.” For further information telephone 01665 602870 or email: Alnwickreg@northumberland.gov.uk
  2. The North East Chilli Festival is all-change as it announces its 2018 dates with hot-off-the-press news revealing that it’s having a new look, a new theme and a new location. Northumberland ’s popular festival, which tried out a new home in Blyth last year following a five-year run at Seaton Delaval Hall, is on the move again. Having encountered a few problems last time, the festival is to have a new Blyth home this year when it returns for a July 13-15 run. Its new site will be Meggies Burn Fields at South Beach which has also prompted a theme for the event: The Festival by the Sea. And while its focus will remain very much on chilli - with the traditional eating competition at the heart of the fun - 2018 will feature a broader menu of attractions to whet all appetites. Music-wise, there are already several confirmed bands including local favourites Smoove and Turrell, and The Mariachis who are well known for the Doritos TV adverts.
  3. Modest precept rise for council

    Members of Seaton Valley Council agreed to restrict the increase in its element of the council tax for 2018/19 to two per cent at a recent meeting.
  4. Are you looking to buy a house on a budget? Maybe you want a new home for yourself or a little investment project to do up and sell or let. Either way, there are plenty of homes to chose from in Newcastle and the wider North East if you have £100,000 or less to spend. From an apartment in Alnwick, Northumberland, to a flat in a former cigarette building on the Coast Road in Newcastle. Here are some of the homes we’ve spotted on the market right now. It’s in Percy Mews and has a guide price of £73,500 through Sanderson Young.
  5. Community funding on offer

    The Ted Weekes Fund at the Community Foundation for Tyne & Wear and Northumberland welcomes applications from community groups in support of children and young people’s projects operating in the areas of New Hartley and Seaton Sluice.
  6. WI joins fight to End Plastic Soup

    Women’s Institute members in Seaton Valley have joined a national fight to tackle the growing problem of marine pollution.
  7. Work is due to start on the Northumberland stretch of the England Coast Path which is set to become the longest managed and way marked coastal path in the world. The 2,795 mile route will follow the coastline of England and Wales and is due to open in 2020. It will pass stunning beaches, castles, fishing villages, famous seaside resorts and dramatic landscape features, offering walkers the opportunity to experience some of the country’s most varied coastline. In Northumberland the coastal path will follow a route from the Scottish Borders right down the coastline via Berwick and Bamburgh to Seaton Sluice. Northumberland County Council will carry out the work to establish the path and will be responsible for its ongoing maintenance. Natural England will fund the establishment of the route and 75 per cent of the ongoing maintenance costs. Work on the first section of the route between Seaton Sluice and Amble is to commence over the coming weeks. An initial grant of £149,250 has been awarded to Northumberland County Council by Natural England to cover these costs. Northumberland County Councillor Glen Sanderson Cabinet Member for the environment and local services said: “ This new path will be a great addition to those who already know our superb coastline but it will open up new opportunities for visitors who want to explore the wonderful assets we have in our county. Additionally the path will help draw in visitors all year round and help provide a boost to local businesses along its length.” The new route will, where possible, link into the existing Northumberland Coastal Path, but sections will need to be added to allow it to directly follow the coastline of the county. The Seaton Sluice to Amble stretch of the route has already been agreed by the Secretary of State and was proposed by Natural England following extensive research and consultation with landowners and Northumberland County Council. It will follow existing pathways on council land and recorded highways and footways and so only minor work such as the installation of gates and signage is needed. Work is ongoing with the planning of other sections of the route in the county. New stretches of grass pathway will need to be created between Newbiggin and Lynemouth and between Cresswell and Druridge. A further two sections of the Northumberland route - Amble to Bamburgh and Bamburgh to the Scottish Borders, are still in the research and consultation phase.
  8. Filming for the new series o ITV1 's Vera is now underway across the North East - so where will the intrepid detective venture next? The soaring success of the Northumberland -set crime drama has been credited with bringing an influx of visitors to the region. The so-called “Vera effect” - with viewers proving keen to see the on-screen beauty spots for themselves - has had welcome knock-on results for the local economy too. And now these are being felt wider afield as DCI Vera Stanhope - a role which Brenda Blethyn made her own - has been exploring more and more of the area outside her usual patch over the series’ run. By now, cast and crew have filmed over much of the region, with Vera’s cases and escalating crime luring her into the city centre and around North and South Tyneside. The landscapes used are increasingly varied, ranging from the sweeping splendour of Dunstanburgh Castle to the industrial backdrop of the former Swan Hunter shipyard in Wallsend .
  9. Police are appealing for information after a woman was robbed in a street in Seaton Delaval.
  10. A 61-year-old woman was punched by a robber who ran off with her handbag in Seaton Delaval . Police are searching for the culprit as well as a teenage Good Samaritan who chased the offender and retrieved the victim’s bag. The woman was walking on Hallington Drive at about 6pm on Saturday, December 9, when she was confronted by a man who attacked her and stole her bag. Officers say she was left with minor injuries but was left shaken. The offender is described as a white male, 5ft 8in, clean shaven. He was wearing dark coloured trousers and hoodie, and aged between 40-50 years of age. A spokesperson for Northumbria Police said: “Inquiries into the incident are ongoing and extra officers have been patrolling the area but now police have appealed for any witnesses to the incident to get in touch.
  11. Police in Northumberland are appealing for information after a woman was robbed in the street. A 61-year-old woman was walking on Hallington Drive in Seaton Delaval at about 6pm on Saturday December 9, when she was confronted by a man who punched her and stole her bag. The woman was left with minor injuries from the incident but was understandably left shaken. The offender is described as a white male, 5ft 8in, clean shaven. He was wearing dark coloured trousers and hoody, and aged between 40-50 years of age. Enquiries into the incident are ongoing and extra officers have been patrolling the area but now police have appealed for any witnesses to the incident to get in touch. Officers particularly want to speak to a man believed to be around 17-years-old who helped the woman, chased the offender and retrieved the handbag. Anyone who saw the incident, or believes they may have information about the man responsible, should contact officers on 101 quoting reference number 154604J/17 or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.
  12. An emotional film has inspired the landlady at a pub in Seaton Delaval to come up with an angelic idea that will bring joy to kids in need during the festive period.
  13. The village of Holywell, near Whitley Bay, is one I’ve long admired and even fantasised about living in (although I’m not sure how well the Eatsmobile would fit in there). Having heard that the Milbourne Arms there had started offering food a year or so ago, I was keen to see if it lived up to my idealised notions of this green and tranquil locale. Our first impressions were that it’s a light and airy place with very fresh-looking decor. It was also clear that it’s a pretty popular with both drinkers and diners, so it was more in hope than expectation that I asked one of the barmaids if there was a table available for two. She consulted a reservations book then directed us to a few tables she said were free for the time being, although two had ‘reserved’ signs on them. We installed ourselves at the one without a sign, only for the man in charge to appear and tell us (rather gruffly, it has to be said) that he’d have to move us as the tables were soon to be needed. We ended up at a corner table underneath the dart board beside a radiator which Mrs E was pleased to find was on. So was our meal on target? There was a disappointment to begin with, as we’d both fancied starting our meal with some soup, it being a nippy November day. The Milbourne Arms, it turns out, offers only main courses and desserts on Sundays - but we were assured the portions would be large enough to satisfy us. The meats on offer were chicken, lamb, pork and beef, all going for around £10-£11. Mrs E, unable to decide which of these would best sate her, opted for the ‘trio’ of meats (lamb, pork and beef) for £11.95. Conscious that I may have neglected vegetarian Sunday diners over the years, I went for the goat’s cheese, broccoli, spinach and caramelised red onion pie (£7.95), which is in fact the only alternative to the traditional meat roasts. We had to wait too long for our food to arrive in Mrs E’s opinion - although I think 20 minutes or so wasn’t too unreasonable given that we were customers who had been fitted in without a booking. And my meal was certainly worth waiting for. The pie, served, as both dishes were, with a good selection of vegetables, a Yorkshire pudding and gravy, was a taste sensation. The light pastry was just right blend of the cheese and the other fillings was so delectable that I ended up mashing the pie up with everything else on my plate in order to get a taste of it with every forkful.
  14. The countdown is on to Christmas Day and December 1 tends to be the date that many families like to start decking the hall and - forget the sprig of holly - go all-out with a sparkling and glitter-strewn frenzy of decorations. Top of the festive things-to-get list is, of course, the tree and putting it up is always guaranteed to bring on the Christmas spirit. Some may ponder the decision 'fake or fir?' but an ever-growing number of people love having a real Christmas tree which, as well as using about 10 times fewer materials and five times less energy than artificial trees, they can smell wonderful. Aside from the pleasure of decorating it, half the fun is going out and choosing a tree in the first place. For many families it is as much a festive tradition as pulling crackers and singing carols. So for those of you who want to snuggle up in nostalgia and revel in the aroma of pine, here’s our list of where to buy your tree (most of them will sell artificial varieties too as well as Christmas wreaths and mistletoe).
  15. The countdown is on to Christmas Day and December 1 tends to be the date that many families like to start decking the hall and - forget the sprig of holly - go all-out with a sparkling and glitter-strewn frenzy of decorations. Top of the festive things-to-get list is, of course, the tree and putting it up is always guaranteed to bring on the Christmas spirit. Some may ponder the decision 'fake or fir?' but an ever-growing number of people love having a real Christmas tree which, as well as using about 10 times fewer materials and five times less energy than artificial trees, they can smell wonderful. Aside from the pleasure of decorating it, half the fun is going out and choosing a tree in the first place. For many families it is as much a festive tradition as pulling crackers and singing carols. So for those of you who want to snuggle up in nostalgia and revel in the aroma of pine, here’s our list of where to buy your tree (most of them will sell artificial varieties too as well as Christmas wreaths and mistletoe).
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