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Found 33 results

  1. The North East Chilli Festival is all-change as it announces its 2018 dates with hot-off-the-press news revealing that it’s having a new look, a new theme and a new location. Northumberland ’s popular festival, which tried out a new home in Blyth last year following a five-year run at Seaton Delaval Hall, is on the move again. Having encountered a few problems last time, the festival is to have a new Blyth home this year when it returns for a July 13-15 run. Its new site will be Meggies Burn Fields at South Beach which has also prompted a theme for the event: The Festival by the Sea. And while its focus will remain very much on chilli - with the traditional eating competition at the heart of the fun - 2018 will feature a broader menu of attractions to whet all appetites. Music-wise, there are already several confirmed bands including local favourites Smoove and Turrell, and The Mariachis who are well known for the Doritos TV adverts.
  2. Are you looking to buy a house on a budget? Maybe you want a new home for yourself or a little investment project to do up and sell or let. Either way, there are plenty of homes to chose from in Newcastle and the wider North East if you have £100,000 or less to spend. From an apartment in Alnwick, Northumberland, to a flat in a former cigarette building on the Coast Road in Newcastle. Here are some of the homes we’ve spotted on the market right now. It’s in Percy Mews and has a guide price of £73,500 through Sanderson Young.
  3. Filming for the new series o ITV1 's Vera is now underway across the North East - so where will the intrepid detective venture next? The soaring success of the Northumberland -set crime drama has been credited with bringing an influx of visitors to the region. The so-called “Vera effect” - with viewers proving keen to see the on-screen beauty spots for themselves - has had welcome knock-on results for the local economy too. And now these are being felt wider afield as DCI Vera Stanhope - a role which Brenda Blethyn made her own - has been exploring more and more of the area outside her usual patch over the series’ run. By now, cast and crew have filmed over much of the region, with Vera’s cases and escalating crime luring her into the city centre and around North and South Tyneside. The landscapes used are increasingly varied, ranging from the sweeping splendour of Dunstanburgh Castle to the industrial backdrop of the former Swan Hunter shipyard in Wallsend .
  4. A 61-year-old woman was punched by a robber who ran off with her handbag in Seaton Delaval . Police are searching for the culprit as well as a teenage Good Samaritan who chased the offender and retrieved the victim’s bag. The woman was walking on Hallington Drive at about 6pm on Saturday, December 9, when she was confronted by a man who attacked her and stole her bag. Officers say she was left with minor injuries but was left shaken. The offender is described as a white male, 5ft 8in, clean shaven. He was wearing dark coloured trousers and hoodie, and aged between 40-50 years of age. A spokesperson for Northumbria Police said: “Inquiries into the incident are ongoing and extra officers have been patrolling the area but now police have appealed for any witnesses to the incident to get in touch.
  5. The village of Holywell, near Whitley Bay, is one I’ve long admired and even fantasised about living in (although I’m not sure how well the Eatsmobile would fit in there). Having heard that the Milbourne Arms there had started offering food a year or so ago, I was keen to see if it lived up to my idealised notions of this green and tranquil locale. Our first impressions were that it’s a light and airy place with very fresh-looking decor. It was also clear that it’s a pretty popular with both drinkers and diners, so it was more in hope than expectation that I asked one of the barmaids if there was a table available for two. She consulted a reservations book then directed us to a few tables she said were free for the time being, although two had ‘reserved’ signs on them. We installed ourselves at the one without a sign, only for the man in charge to appear and tell us (rather gruffly, it has to be said) that he’d have to move us as the tables were soon to be needed. We ended up at a corner table underneath the dart board beside a radiator which Mrs E was pleased to find was on. So was our meal on target? There was a disappointment to begin with, as we’d both fancied starting our meal with some soup, it being a nippy November day. The Milbourne Arms, it turns out, offers only main courses and desserts on Sundays - but we were assured the portions would be large enough to satisfy us. The meats on offer were chicken, lamb, pork and beef, all going for around £10-£11. Mrs E, unable to decide which of these would best sate her, opted for the ‘trio’ of meats (lamb, pork and beef) for £11.95. Conscious that I may have neglected vegetarian Sunday diners over the years, I went for the goat’s cheese, broccoli, spinach and caramelised red onion pie (£7.95), which is in fact the only alternative to the traditional meat roasts. We had to wait too long for our food to arrive in Mrs E’s opinion - although I think 20 minutes or so wasn’t too unreasonable given that we were customers who had been fitted in without a booking. And my meal was certainly worth waiting for. The pie, served, as both dishes were, with a good selection of vegetables, a Yorkshire pudding and gravy, was a taste sensation. The light pastry was just right blend of the cheese and the other fillings was so delectable that I ended up mashing the pie up with everything else on my plate in order to get a taste of it with every forkful.
  6. The countdown is on to Christmas Day and December 1 tends to be the date that many families like to start decking the hall and - forget the sprig of holly - go all-out with a sparkling and glitter-strewn frenzy of decorations. Top of the festive things-to-get list is, of course, the tree and putting it up is always guaranteed to bring on the Christmas spirit. Some may ponder the decision 'fake or fir?' but an ever-growing number of people love having a real Christmas tree which, as well as using about 10 times fewer materials and five times less energy than artificial trees, they can smell wonderful. Aside from the pleasure of decorating it, half the fun is going out and choosing a tree in the first place. For many families it is as much a festive tradition as pulling crackers and singing carols. So for those of you who want to snuggle up in nostalgia and revel in the aroma of pine, here’s our list of where to buy your tree (most of them will sell artificial varieties too as well as Christmas wreaths and mistletoe).
  7. The countdown is on to Christmas Day and December 1 tends to be the date that many families like to start decking the hall and - forget the sprig of holly - go all-out with a sparkling and glitter-strewn frenzy of decorations. Top of the festive things-to-get list is, of course, the tree and putting it up is always guaranteed to bring on the Christmas spirit. Some may ponder the decision 'fake or fir?' but an ever-growing number of people love having a real Christmas tree which, as well as using about 10 times fewer materials and five times less energy than artificial trees, they can smell wonderful. Aside from the pleasure of decorating it, half the fun is going out and choosing a tree in the first place. For many families it is as much a festive tradition as pulling crackers and singing carols. So for those of you who want to snuggle up in nostalgia and revel in the aroma of pine, here’s our list of where to buy your tree (most of them will sell artificial varieties too as well as Christmas wreaths and mistletoe).
  8. If you’ve been searching for something special to spruce up your Christmas, then look no further than the Edelweiss Christmas Tree Company. Based at Seaton Delaval in Whitley Bay, customers will have access to a range of more than 7,000 trees, which includes the Nordman Fir, Norway Spruce Noble Fir, Lodgepole Pine and Fraser Fir. Trained staff will also be on hand to help visitors every step of the way, from choosing the perfect tree and packaging it up, to giving out aftercare advice and decorating tips. During the weekends leading up to Christmas – starting on November 25 through to December 10 – children will be able to visit Santa in his magical grotto, while the grown-ups enjoy a complimentary glass of mulled wine, mince pie and hot soup. So for a Christmas to remember, head to the Edelweiss Christmas Tree Company in Double Row, Seaton Delaval, Whitley Bay, tel: 0191 237 7887, or visit: www.edelweiss-trees.com
  9. Below is a list of this week's Tyne & Wear community events written by you. To get your event included, simply fill out the form at www.chroniclelive.co.uk/yourevents What: intu Eldon Square has a magical two-day extravaganza, including an enchanting visit from an animatronic Snow Lion, mystical fauns, festive food sampling and the launch of intu’s Magic Tree app - a digital augmented reality experience. When: Thursday 23 November 2017 (4pm - 8pm) and Friday 24 November 2017 (12pm - 4pm). Where: intu Eldon Square What: West Rainton Church Christmas fayre. When: 18th November 2017 at 2pm.
  10. Drivers are being advised ahead of a series of road closures throughout the North East on Remembrance Sunday. Thousands throughout the region will join together at a host of events to pay tribute to our fallen soldiers. ChronicleLive is compiling a gallery of photographs to show services and remembrance events across the North East, so please send a photograph to yourpictures@chroniclelive.co.uk telling us when and where you were. And if you’re planning on travelling by car on the morning of Remembrance Sunday, here is a list of the road closures that will temporarily be in place: Alnwick 3.15pm to 4pm - Percy Street, Green Batt, Hotspur Street. Bondgate Without, Bondgate Within, Fenkle Street
  11. Drivers are being advised ahead of a series of road closures throughout the North East on Remembrance Sunday. Thousands throughout the region will join together at a host of events to pay tribute to our fallen soldiers. ChronicleLive is compiling a gallery of photographs to show services and remembrance events across the North East, so please send a photograph to yourpictures@chroniclelive.co.uk telling us when and where you were. And if you’re planning on travelling by car on the morning of Remembrance Sunday, here is a list of the road closures that will temporarily be in place: Alnwick 3.15pm to 4pm - Percy Street, Green Batt, Hotspur Street. Bondgate Without, Bondgate Within, Fenkle Street
  12. Heartbroken friends of tragic Susan Fuller are raising money to help her grieving family. The popular mum-of-three died after she was allegedly hit by a car, outside her home on Friday. Sean Herman appeared in court earlier this week, accused of murdering Susan. And today as her family attempt to come to terms with her death friends have been rallying round to help. An online fundraising page has been set-up on the site ‘gofundme’ and so far more than £200 has been donated. It’s creator, Margaret Emm, wrote: “I’ve decided to try and raise some funds for the family of Susan Fuller who has tragically lost her life. The way Susan died was horrific she leaves behind her loving husband David and her much loved sons Barrie, Dale and Scott. Susan was a well known and much loved friend and her passing has been a big shock we are trying to help with any costs that may arise ie bills and funeral costs etc till the family get back on their feet. Please share and donate if you can.”
  13. This is the man accused of killing a mum-of-three in an alleged hit-and-run in Howdon. Sean Herman appeared at North Tyneside Magistrates’ Court on Monday charged with murdering 63-year-old Susan Fuller outside her home on Coldstream Gardens. The 24-year-old also faced two further charges of assaulting her two sons - Dale and Scott - arising from the same alleged incident on Friday morning. Because of the seriousness of the alleged offence, no pleas were able to be taken during the brief hearing. Wearing a grey tracksuit and breathing deeply, Herman, of Tillmouth Avenue, Seaton Delaval, was in the dock to confirm his name, date of birth and address. More than 10 police officers also attended the court to keep large groups of Herman’s and Susan’s family separate.
  14. A violent hospital patient waved a knife blade around and slashed a security guard after flying into a fit of rage. Diabetic David Crowe brandished the weapon at Northumbria Specialist Emergency Care Hospital (NSEC), in Cramlington, after being taken there in the early hours of the morning because he was suffering from a hypo. But as three security guards and a nurse tried desperately to disarm the 39-year-old drug addict, he lashed out and slashed one of the guards on the arm, a court was told. Another security guard also suffered a cut to his knee during a scuffle to remove the weapon from Crowe’s hand, while a third suffered a back injury, prosecutors said. Now, Crowe, of Ridsdale Close, Seaton Delaval, is facing a jail sentence after he pleaded guilty to wounding without intent, affray and possession of a bladed article. South East Northumberland Magistrates’ Court heard that Crowe, who is Type 1 diabetic and a long-term drug abuser, was taken to NSEC at around 5am on September 24 suffering from a suspected hypo, which is caused when blood sugars are too low.
  15. October and the half-term break provides a great opportunity to get our and about exploring the North East’s beautiful coast and countryside to discover some of its hidden gems. From the dunes of the Northumberland Coast to the rugged landscape of Hadrian’s Wall, the region has plenty to offer. If you’re looking for something to do with the whole family, then why not visit one of the National Trust places in the North East. With houses, buildings and gardens to coast and countryside across the region, there is something for everyone. Here’s our guide to the National Trust places you should visit. Address: Near Rowlands Gill, Gateshead, Tyne & Wear, NE16 6BG, 01207 541820
  16. A heartless burglar who raided the home of his mum’s disabled friend and stole her engagement ring has had his sentence cut. George David Bell, 42, abused the trust of his mum’s pal after he was given access to a key to her home to walk her dog. Bell carried out the favour for the woman, who has learning disabilities and epilepsy, then cynically re-used the key around a week later to raid her home. As well as the precious ring, he stole £200, important personal documents such as her passport and other jewellery - none of which has ever been recovered. Bell, of Kearsley Close, Seaton Delaval, Northumberland, was a recovering heroin addict, with a “dreadful record” for offences of theft and burglary. The “mean” thief was jailed for two years and three months at Newcastle Crown Court in July after he admitted burglary.
  17. One of the heroic rescuers who helped save a man from falling from the Tyne Bridge has told of how he had to “summon every last ounce of strength“ to cling on. Andrew Fairlamb was one of three passers-by that saved a man who was precariously clinging on to the edge of the bridge 100ft above the water. He was driving home to Seaton Delaval after finishing a six-hour shift working on the climbing wall at Gateshead Leisure Centre on Sunday night when he spotted a woman frantically gesturing for help. Andrew ran over to where the man was, and, along with two other women, held on to him until more help arrived. He explained: “I was coming home from work, driving across the Tyne Bridge when I was flagged down by a lady. I stopped and saw these two women were hanging on to this bloke on the edge of the bridge. “I grabbed an arm and clung on for dear life, knowing I couldn’t let go.
  18. A carnival atmosphere was created in Northumberland as tens of thousands of people turned out for the second stage of the OVO Energy Tour of Britain . From Kielder to Blyth, the spectators lined the streets creating a wall of noise as the cyclists powered their way around the 211km course. And the county’s beautiful countryside provided an impressive backdrop for one of the most exciting events on the racing calendar. Despite the huge climbs and tricky corners, the riders weren’t short of passionate support from the pavements. People transformed their streets and gardens into a sea of red and yellow - the colours of the Northumberland flag - by hanging metres of bunting and flags to welcome them. For the start of the race, hundreds of people descended on Kielder Dam as more than 100 riders were introduced to the crowd.
  19. Millions of pounds could be generated for Northumberland’s economy on Monday as the next stage of Britain’s top cycling race gets under way. The county is hosting the second stage of the OVO Energy Tour of Britain, starting in the heart of Kielder before a dramatic finish on the coast of Blyth. And tens of thousands of spectators are expected to line the streets as the 211km route is decorated in red and yellow bunting and displays - the colours of the Northumberland flag. The cycling extravaganza is being shown live on ITV4 and will be broadcast in more than 120 countries. Coun Richard Wearmouth, Northumberland County Council’s cabinet member for economic development, predicts the race could be another big hit after it generated £2.2m for county two years ago. He said: “In 2015 the Tour of Britain gave a real boost to the local economy and we’re confident this year’s stage which is entirely in the county, will be great news for businesses in Northumberland. “In 2015 only the final three hours were broadcast live on TV - this year we have the complete stage broadcast throughout the day worldwide from Kielder to Blyth.
  20. The eyes of the world will be on Northumberland on Monday as the eagerly anticipated OVO Energy Tour of Britain returns to the county. The streets are expected to be decked in red and yellow, the colour of the Northumberland flag, as thousands of spectators gather to catch a glimpse of the cyclists. Northumberland will host an entire stage of the race, starting in the heart of Kielder before a dramatic finish on the coast of Blyth. And the excitement is building as the world’s elite riders get ready to whizz through 28 towns and villages, covering a total of 211kms. Northumberland County Council leader Peter Jackson said: “The race will travel through some fantastic scenery and pass iconic landmarks including Bamburgh Castle and Alnwick Castle. “The tour is to be broadcast in over 120 countries and we look forward to providing a warm welcome to the competitors and supporters and showcasing our beautiful county and communities to a huge global audience.”
  21. The cost of petrol is going up but you didn’t need us to tell you that. It might not be as bad as 2012 and 2013 when prices were generally higher but it’s still a burden for North East drivers. What you might not know - and we’re sorry for breaking the news - is that the cost of driving in the last week of August shot up by 6p a litre from last year. So if you think it cost more to reach your Bank Holiday destination last week than you remember from 12 months ago, you’re right. But you can still shop around for the cheapest prices even when the Bank Holiday is a distant memory. Comprison site PetrolPrices.com says the lowest unleaded prices within five miles of Newcastle city centre on Friday was 114.7p per litre.
  22. This round-up of events is written by readers. To get your charity event or story included, simply fill out the form at www.chroniclelive.co.uk/charitynews A camping club for veterans has been set up thanks to a major clean up initiative at the Glastonbury Festival which allows charities to collect left-over camping equipment. The veterans at registered charity Launchpad based in Newcastle upon Tyne, which provides extensive housing, employment and welfare support for veterans living at Avondale House in Byker, often voiced their desire to go camping to assistant manager (projects), Julie Crocker, during weekly resident’s meetings. However, a lack of kit or funding meant the camping trips could not go ahead. Julie however, heard a news report about the initiative set up by Glastonbury Festival that allows charities to apply to visit the site to collect any leftover tents, chairs and sleeping bags once the festival is over. After receiving a phone call with the news that Launchpad were successful in their application, two of the veterans from Avondale House drove the charity’s mini bus and began their epic journey to the site. After a 700-mile round trip and nearly 24hrs later, they returned with enough camping equipment for all their fellow veterans. During the six-hour site visit, they managed to collect 11 tents, 16 sleeping bags, 13 camping chairs, roll mats and a double air bed.
  23. Here's how schools across the North East performed in the Ofsted inspections published in July
  24. The focus is turning to Whitley Bay Film Festival as preparations get rolling for the return of the annual treat. And it promises to be a crowd-puller with programme highlights this time around including a visit from Our Friends In The North writer Peter Flannery; a silent horror night - with live soundtrack - at a stately home, and archive film celebrating our local heritage. The festival, which has Ian La Frenais as its patron, might have started out small but it always had big ambitions and it has succeeded in becoming a highlight of the region’s summer calender. With revamp work currently underway in Whitley Bay, the Dome - one of its previous host locations - is out of bounds but there are plenty other venues, including people’s homes, St Mary’s Lighthouse, Seaton Delaval Hall and the great outdoors, to add the festival’s trademark quirky touch. And it is dipping its toes beyond the coast for the first time to team up with the Tyne Theatre & Opera House in Newcastle to help mark the venue’s 150th birthday year. Another collaboration sees organisers team up with North East Film Archive to present a mini-festival: Moving North: Coastal Comes to Whitley Bay.
  25. The mystery surrounding a mining sculpture which appeared to have been beheaded by vandals has been solved. People in Seaton Delaval, Northumberland, awoke on Tuesday morning to find the head of the statue in Astley Park was missing. Designed by artist Tom Newstead, the sculpture is being craved out of a tree stump to commemorate the village’s mining heritage. But neighbours were left outraged when they initially thought it had been damaged overnight by yobs. Mum Lynn French, who lives nearby the park, said: “I’ve seen the sculpture gradually progress and the gentleman was working on it yesterday. “Then I saw reports on Facebook that it had been vandalised late last night.
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